What Do Your Color Choices Say To Your Visitors?

Colors – they say a lot about a website. As a society, we’ve been studying colors and the associations behind them for a long time. There have been sociological and psychological studies performed, history studied, and more. No matter what is behind how we perceive colors, there is no denying certain colors evoke certain emotions. What are the colors of your website saying to your customers?

Stay Calm with Blue


Image via Flickr by stevendepolo

Blue has long been seen as a calm, cool color. In web design it also shows that you are trustworthy. There are a variety of major companies that use cool shades of blue to help portray this in their branding. Take Microsoft for example. Blue works great with any number of products and industries.

Continue reading “What Do Your Color Choices Say To Your Visitors?”

A/B Testing vs. Multivariate Testing: Which is Best For You?

If you have a website, you need to make sure that you market it well. However, to do that, you need to know exactly what your customers are looking for. There are a variety of ways to do this, but the two most debated options are A/B testing and multivariate testing. What are the differences? Which is better for your site?

Learning the Basics of the Two

First, you need to understand the differences between A/B testing and multivariate testing. There are several key differences, so establishing those is the first move creating the most effective landing page.

  • A/B testing – After creating two versions of a website, you split the traffic coming to your site evenly between the two.
  • Multivariate testing – You only have one version of the website. You are testing a variety of elements inside the page, to see what is most popular.

Continue reading “A/B Testing vs. Multivariate Testing: Which is Best For You?”

If I’d had more time I would have written a shorter letter . . .

200px-Seuss-cat-hat

Dr. Suess wrote The Cat in the Hat with only 236 words, so his editor bet him that he couldn’t write a book with only 50 different words. Dr. Suess won the bet with Green Eggs & Ham, which became one of the best-selling children’s books of all time.”

This is a quote from my favorite chapter of Steal Like an Artist titled “Choose What to Leave Out”, and it applies directly to EVERYTHING in CRO.

Communicating rich thoughts and ideas with minimal waste is called “word economy” when we’re copywriting or designing headline experiments.

This is directly applicable to minimizing  page elements, focused messaging, effective elevator pitches, or building your deck.

On the CRO side alone I’ve written out several examples of this concept in motion:

Simple, beautiful and distilled messaging ALWAYS wins in my experience.

Kind of like this: “Full service conversion rate optimization on a performance basiscontact us today!

Will “Merry Christmas” really double the conversion rate over “Happy Holidays”?

A new CNN article suggests that “Merry Christmas” still rings brighter over “Happy Holidays”

The demographics breakdown

Overall poll results for Americans:

  • 64% prefer “Merry Christmas”
  • 31% prefer “Happy Holidays”
  • 5% are unsure

 

Ok. So now you’ve got some data from a obscure poll that says solid majority of Americans prefer you to say “Merry Christmas”. The question is what do you do with that? Do you put “Merry Christmas” on every page? Maybe on banner ads? What about emails? Or should you say it at all?

Well, since we are into testing, we cajoled one of our clients to let us test Merry Christmas v. Happy Holiday a couple Christmases ago. The client allowed us to test this with specific email campaigns, and below are results: (from a prior post.)

We wanted to know if using “Merry Christmas” versus “Happy Holidays” in an email campaign to a small segment of customers  would impact conversion rates?

We were able to randomly select a group of 100,000 customers for a client and tested these subject lines:


A few notes on the test:

  • The client is a large retailer, their customers mirror a general sample of the USA.
  • The email mirrored the subject line’s message; all other elements were the same.
  • We sent the email on the 21st of December.

The results showed a HUGE difference . . .

As you can clearly see, “Merry Christmas” killed it, nearly doubling the click through rate of the other subject lines.

Although we’re not allowed to share the “buy” data, it was just as impressive. Nearly doubling the number of transactions by changing an email subject line shows just how important it is to test and try new things. If you’re not constantly testing, you’re throwing money away!

 

Have any of you tested MC vs. HH and seen a difference? Do tell us. We wish you a Happy Holiday season! ;-P

When to Throw Out a Page in Landing Page Optimization Testing

Landing page optimization is a process. Your marketing team boosts results 5% here, 12% there, and gains a little each time. Before you know it, the conversion rate is twice as high as when you started. Boom!

HiPPO conversion optimizationWhen you’ve worked the same page for a while, though, that steady pace can turn into a jungle death march. The quicksand grabs your boots. The HiPPOs get restless. Your results linger in single digits. Half your tests show a decline. You feel stuck.

At that point, forget the quicksand. It’s time to burn down the jungle! Start over with a completely different page.

Think big. Go crazy. Never Quit Testing!! Try something completely different. You just might learn something.

Optimize the other way

The goal of your new page should be to learn something about the audience. One way to do this is with a completely opposite approach. Here’s what we mean:

  • Images – is your page image heavy? Chances are that some of those images aren’t carrying their weight or supporting the offer. Try cutting most of them – or all of them. Focus on the page’s copy and layout and give your designer a rest.
  • Layout – Have you set a horizontal eye path, getting people to look from left to right? Then try vertical. Start by grabbing attention at the top of the page and guiding it down to the call-to-action. Another idea is to cut almost everything from the page. Place all the information in the center and give visitors nothing to look at except the most vital info. Continue reading “When to Throw Out a Page in Landing Page Optimization Testing”